ScienceDirect - TermAhlynewsInfo

ScienceDirect

A review of design considerations in glass buildings

  • Shop & Browse

    • By Category

      • Classics
      • Seating
      • Tables
      • Outdoor
      • Accessories
      • Quickship
      • New & Expanded
      • Ergonomic Chairs
      • Files & Storage
      • Textiles

      • Felt & Leather
    • For Home

      • Living Room
      • Dining Room
      • Kitchen
      • Outdoor
      • Home Office
      • Kids
      • #myknoll Gallery

      • The Lookbook

    • For Office

      • Work Chairs
      • Tables & Desks
      • Side Chairs
      • Lounge Furniture
      • Files & Storage
      • Accessories & Tools
      • Office Design 101

    • By Designer

      • David Adjaye
      • Antenna Design
      • Barber Osgerby
      • Harry Bertoia
      • Marcel Breuer
      • Dorothy Cosonas
      • Formway Design
      • Florence Knoll
      • Ludwig Mies van der Rohe
      • Marc Newson
      • Warren Platner
      • Jens Risom
      • David Rockwell
      • Eero Saarinen
      • Richard Schultz
      • All Designers
    • KnollTextiles

      • KnollTextiles Home

      • Recent Introductions
      • Upholstery
      • Panel Fabrics
      • Wallcovering
      • Drapery
      • Custom Capabilities
      • Acoustic Tiles
      • Knoll Luxe
      • Hospitality
      • Healthcare
      • Environmental Fabrics
      • Kaiser Permanente® Approved Fabrics
      • Program Partners
      • Contact Us
      • What’s New: Summer 2018

      • NeoCon 2018

      • The Bonjour Collection

      • The Signature Collection

    • Inspiration

      • Home Design Inspiration

      • The Lookbook

      • #myknoll Gallery

  • Design & Plan

    • Products

    • Planning

    • Markets

      • Healthcare
      • Education
      • Small Business and Startups
      • Legal
      • Government/GSA
      • Canadian Federal Government
      • Global Business Division
      • Residential
    • Resources

    • NeoCon

      • Hospitality at Work

      • Knoll Live Events
      • Images & Resources
    • Research

      • All Research

      • Benchmarking

      • Change Management

      • Case Studies

      • Design + Planning

      • Ergonomics + Well-Being

      • Infographics

      • Products

      • Work Trends

    • Inspiration

      • Workplace Inspiration
      • Project Profiles

      • Planning Ideas

    • Essentials

  • Discover Knoll

    • About Knoll

      • Why Knoll?

      • What Drives Us

      • The Knoll Timeline

      • Our Designers

    • Newsroom

    • Sales Teams

    • Investor Relations

    • Careers

THE ANNUAL SALE: 9/14 – 9/25 | 15% OFF AND FREE DELIVERY
THE ANNUAL SALE: 9/14 – 9/25 | 15% OFF AND FREE DELIVERY
  • 1.800.343.5665
  • locations

Knoll


  • Shop & Browse

    • By Category

      • Classics
      • Seating
      • Tables
      • Outdoor
      • Accessories
      • Quickship
      • New & Expanded
      • Ergonomic Chairs
      • Files & Storage
      • Textiles

      • Felt & Leather
    • For Home

      • Living Room
      • Dining Room
      • Kitchen
      • Outdoor
      • Home Office
      • Kids
      • #myknoll Gallery

      • The Lookbook

    • For Office

      • Work Chairs
      • Tables & Desks
      • Side Chairs
      • Lounge Furniture
      • Files & Storage
      • Accessories & Tools
      • Office Design 101

    • By Designer

      • David Adjaye
      • Antenna Design
      • Barber Osgerby
      • Harry Bertoia
      • Marcel Breuer
      • Dorothy Cosonas
      • Formway Design
      • Florence Knoll
      • Ludwig Mies van der Rohe
      • Marc Newson
      • Warren Platner
      • Jens Risom
      • David Rockwell
      • Eero Saarinen
      • Richard Schultz
      • All Designers
    • KnollTextiles

      • KnollTextiles Home

      • Recent Introductions
      • Upholstery
      • Panel Fabrics
      • Wallcovering
      • Drapery
      • Custom Capabilities
      • Acoustic Tiles
      • Knoll Luxe
      • Hospitality
      • Healthcare
      • Environmental Fabrics
      • Kaiser Permanente® Approved Fabrics
      • Program Partners
      • Contact Us
      • What’s New: Summer 2018

      • NeoCon 2018

      • The Bonjour Collection

      • The Signature Collection

    • Inspiration

      • Home Design Inspiration

      • The Lookbook

      • #myknoll Gallery

  • Design & Plan

    • Products

    • Planning

    • Markets

      • Healthcare
      • Education
      • Small Business and Startups
      • Legal
      • Government/GSA
      • Canadian Federal Government
      • Global Business Division
      • Residential
    • Resources

    • NeoCon

      • Hospitality at Work

      • Knoll Live Events
      • Images & Resources
    • Research

      • All Research

      • Benchmarking

      • Change Management

      • Case Studies

      • Design + Planning

      • Ergonomics + Well-Being

      • Infographics

      • Products

      • Work Trends

    • Inspiration

      • Workplace Inspiration
      • Project Profiles

      • Planning Ideas

    • Essentials

  • Discover Knoll

    • About Knoll

      • Why Knoll?

      • What Drives Us

      • The Knoll Timeline

      • Our Designers

    • Newsroom

    • Sales Teams

    • Investor Relations

    • Careers

  • shopping cart (0)

  • Order Status

    Close
    Check Order Status

  • Sign in

  • Shop & Browse
  • Inspiration
  • Design Pulse
  • Philip Johnson’s Thesis House

Philip Johnson’s Thesis House

Ash Street House is a testament to visionary architect’s modernist roots.

 

“I like the thought that what we are to do on this earth is embellish it for its greater beauty, so that oncoming generations can look back to the shapes we leave here and get the same thrill I get in looking back." -Philip Johnson.

Harvard’s Graduate School of Design has recently curated an exhibition on Philip Johnson’s first architectural project, Ash Street House, also know as “Thesis House,” after he submitted it for his Masters of Architecture thesis. The exhibit includes a pop-up lounge of Knoll’s Barcelona Collection (after Johnson’s original configuration of the Ludwig Mies van der Rohe-designed furniture he imported from Europe) along with a series of original photographs by Ezra Stoller, the accomplished architectural photographer, and Iwan Baan.

Barcelona Collection at Philip Johnson's Thesis House
Visitors lounge in Knoll’s Barcelona Chair and Couch. The arrangement mirrors Johnson’s original configuration of Ludwig Mies van der Rohe’s iconic furniture line. Photograph by Ira Garber.

Although he studied history and philosophy as an undergraduate, Philip Johnson felt the pull of architecture during the extended trips to Europe that punctuated his studies. After visiting the Parthenon, the Chartres Cathedral, and other ancient monuments, he fell in socially with the now-towering figureheads of modern architecture, including Le Corbusier, Walter Gropius, and Mies van der Rohe. Exposure to their ideas, works, and philosophy led Johnson to become a devotee of the Modernist movement. After returning from his sojourn abroad, he set about arranging the exhibition that would present their body of work as a cohesive corpus. In 1932, “International Style: Architecture since 1922” debuted at The Museum of Modern Art to great aplomb and introduced the modern architectural movement to America. 

Sketch of Philip Johnson's Thesis House

Plan of Philip Johnson’s Thesis House, drawn by Wilhelm Viggo von Moltke in 1941-1942, Image courtesy of Columbia University’s Avery Architectural & Fine Arts Library.

Even after the success of the 1932 exhibition, it wasn’t until seven years later that Johnson decided to pursue architecture through formal schooling, enrolling at Harvard’s Graduate School of Design in 1940. He bought an acre plot of land at 9 Ash Street in Harvard Square, Cambridge and set about synthesizing his disparate influences in what would become his first architectural project. The following summary of the house’s construction is courtesy of Harvard’s Graduate School of Design:

“The design of the house went through several iterations, but Johnson found his early attempts limited by a wartime shortage of building materials. Despite these challenges, Johnson continued with his own design and constructed a pre-fabricated structure made of Weldtex, a hollow plywood panel finished with a striated textured veneer that could be used indoors or outdoors.

Johnson’s final design was comprised of two parts: a rectangular house and a courtyard enclosed by a high perimeter fence that corresponds in height to the house’s walls. The fence’s door opens from the street into the private courtyard, which is separated from the interior of the house by a glass and steel façade. The interior spaces are open and flow into one another.”

KnollTextilesShowroom
"Pop-up" Installation of Knoll’s Barcelona Collection. Photograph by Ira Garber.

The fundamental importance of the relationship between the house’s architectural exterior and the lines of its interior furnishings is on full display in the exhibition, with Johnson utilizing an arrangement of Barcelona furniture comparable to that canonized in his Glass House. Johnson, himself, went on to define architecture with respect to interior space, introducing the dialectic that would become characteristic of much of his later work: “Architecture is basically the design of interiors, it’s the art of organizing interior space.” This concept of architecture as interior space explains the nine-foot tall fence that effectively cuts the building off from the surrounding neighborhood while simultaneously incorporating the courtyard into two thirds of the available acreage in the design plan.

Eszter Haratszty

Sketch of Philip Johnson’s Thesis House by an unknown artist. Image from Built in USA 1932-1944 edited by Elizabeth Mock and published by MoMA.

Thus, Johnson’s Thesis House functioned, in many ways, as a template for subsequent projects early in his career in the period leading up to his collaboration with his mentor, Mies van der Rohe, on the Seagrams Building. Those buildings include the Booth (or Damora) House, the John de Menil House, and, of course, the Glass House.

For more information on Thesis House and the current exhibition, please visit Harvard’s Graduate School of Design. The exhibit will be on display through December 18th, 2014.

More Inspiration
  Palettes   Robert Young in East Hampton
  Palettes   A Kid-Proofed Hampton Beach House
  Design Pulse   Our Tools, Our Time: Women at MoMA
  In Conversation  Dorothy Cosonas

 

 

Designers

  • Knoll Designer Mies van der Rohe

    Ludwig Mies van der Rohe

Related Content

  • Discover Knoll Timeline  Explore Now

  • Knoll News coverage Read Now

External Content

  • Discover Harvard’s Graduate School of Design  Explore Now

STAY CONNECTED AND GET INSPIRED

Barcelona® Chair

Barcelona® Stool

Barcelona® Couch

Barcelona® Table

Brno Chair – Flat Bar

Brno Chair – Tubular

Join Us

  • twitter
  • facebook
  • instagram
  • tumblr
  • youtube
  • pinterest
  • morpholio
    • © Knoll, Inc.

    ‘);
    doc.close();
    })();



    Skip to main content

    • Journals & Books
    • Register
      • Sign In
      • Help

       

      Frontiers of Architectural Research

      Frontiers of Architectural Research

      Volume 5, Issue 2 , June 2016 , Pages 171-193
      open access
      Frontiers of Architectural Research

      Review

      A review of design considerations in glass buildings

      Author links open overlay panel FatemehPariafsai

      https://doi.org/10.1016/j.foar.2016.01.006 Get rights and content
      Open Access funded by Higher Education Press Limited Company
      Under a Creative Commons license

      Abstract

      In the past few decades, the use of glass in buildings has remarkably increased. As a result, several transparent buildings have been constructed, in which the materials have almost disappeared. Given that the advancement of architecture is inextricably linked to the acquisition of general knowledge on future developments, this study was conducted to predict the paths of development that glass structures are likely to take in the future. Investigations such as this increase the possibility of advancing both design and construction at the same speed as technology. To achieve this goal, this study evaluates the present situation by investigating new possibilities and assessing their effect on the development of glass buildings. The findings of this study show that the durability, safety, appearance, and efficiency of transparent buildings can be improved through continuous refinement of designs, replacement of aged elements, prompt repair of damaged protective coatings, and greater exploitation of double-sided screens.

      Keywords

      Transparent building
      Glass structure
      Shell
      Adhesive
      Self-healing

      Peer review under responsibility of Southeast University.

      © 2016 The Author. Published by Higher Education Press Limited Company on behalf of Higher Education Press Limited Company
      No articles found.

      Citing articles

      View article metrics

      About ScienceDirect Remote access Shopping cart Contact and support Terms and conditions Privacy policy

      We use cookies to help provide and enhance our service and tailor content and ads. By continuing you agree to the use of cookies .

      Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. or its licensors or contributors. ScienceDirect ® is a registered trademark of Elsevier B.V.